Artist Name


birth2/21/1885 in Arad, HungaryPicture of Kilenyi
death1/29/1959
parents
educationRoyal Art School, Budapest

awardsMember National Sculpture Society




Julio Kilenyi, whose original name is Kilényi Gyula, was born in the city of Arad on February 21, 1885. He was the son of a business man and studied art at the Royal Art School in Budapest. After attending art academies in Germany and France, Kilenyi emigrated to Argentina in 1907 and set up a studio in Buenos Aires.

In 1916, possibly at the urging if medal collector Julius de Lagerburg, he moved to New York City. He became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1924.

Kilenyi was a very prolific medallic sculptor who designed and sculpted many commemorative medals for government and corporations. He was not afraid of doing commercial work, which caused him to be held in somewhat lower esteem than his talent deserved. He is one of the few famous American sculptors of the 1930s and 40s who were not invited to create a medal for the prestigious Society of Medalists, mostly because he was deemed "too commercial."

Among his many medallic works, some clearly stand out from the rest. His aviation medals celebrating the circumnavigation of the globe by Wiley Post and Harry Gatty, the polar expeditions of Admiral Byrd, and the famous transatlantic solo flight by Charles Lindbergh are of very high artistic merit. Medals for the Port Authority of New York and for the Olympic Games in Los Angeles also won wide acclaim.

Then there is the huge body of work he did for commercial enterprises that is simply too voluminous to list.

Kilenyi died in 1959, leaving behind a legacy of medallic works, the best of which do not need to fear comparison to the works of the great medalists.

Sourced from Wikipedia and the sites listed under Resources.



You can click medals to switch between obverse and reverse sides.

Plymouth Tercentenary1920
JK-P300
Bronze

The obverse bears bust of pilgrim, left. Around, PLYMOUTH TERCENTENARY; to left and right of bust, 1620 - 1920; signed below date on right, KILENYI

The reverse bears the seals of the Boston Numismatic Society and the town of Plymouth separated by a burning torch; wreath of laurel (left) and oak (right) tied at bottom behind seals. Around top, SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY; in upper center, BOSTON / NUMISMATIC / SOCIETY

The Boston Numismatic Society was founded in 1860 and celebrated its sixtieth anniversary by issuing this medal. Plymouth, or as it was historically known, Plimoth, was the site chosen for the colony founded by the passengers of the Mayflower. Today, a wonderful living history museum called Plimoth Plantation allows visitors of all ages to experience life in 1627 from the perspectives of both the settlers and the Native Americans.

The circular medal measures 62.8mm in diameter and was struck in bronze by Whitehead and Hoag of Newark, New Jersey.

Shepherd Dog Club of America1925
JK-SDC.1
Bronze
JK-SDC.2
Silver

The obverse bears bust of shepherd dog facing right. Over nose on right, FOUNDED / 1913; around, SHEPHERD-DOG-CLUB / OF-AMERICA; signed over shoulder at right, KILENYI.

The reverse bears idyllic image of sheep pasture with guarding shepherd dog at left and sun on horizon.

The edge is marked MEDALLIC ART CO. N.Y. BRONZE.

The German Shepherd Dog Club of America was founded in 1913 and incorporated in 1916 by Anne Tracy, Margaret C. Throop, Edith May Schley, Vemon Castle, John Volkman, Paul Huhn, & B.R. Ruggles. Like all breed-specific clubs, its mission was to define the breed, participate in shows, and interest the public.

The medal measures 50mm in diameter and was struck in bronze and silver by the Medallic Art Company of New York.

References: MACo 1925-040-01

The Long-Bell Lumber Company - 50th Anniversary1925
JK-LB
Bronze

The obverse bears bust l. of Robert A. Long, founder of the Long-Bell Lumber Company. Around, THE LONG-BELL LUMBER COMPANY / FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY; to left, ROBERT A. LONG / FOUNDER; to right, signed KILENYI.

The reverse bears image of path through forest, surrounded by laurel and oak leaves. Above, LONG-BELL; below in cartouche, 1875-1925.

The Long-Bell Lumber Company was started by Robert A. Long and Victor Bell. They had started out selling hay in Columbus, Ohio, but quickly discovered that the wood they needed to construct storage sheds and wagons was much more precious than their hay cargo, so they tore down the sheds and sold the lumber. In 1887 they officially incorporated the Long-Bell Lumber Company and grew it into a major business.

Their company was sold to International Paper in 1956.

Kilényi picked up the forest motif he had used on the reverse of this medal when he designed the reverse of the Fruit of the Loom medal in 1951.

The medal measures 83mm in diameter.

John D. Larkin 50th Anniversary1925
JK-JDL
Bronze

The obverse bears bust of John D. Larkin facing left. Under truncation, signature, JOHN D. LARKIN.

The reverse bears image of soap factory. Above, FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY; to left and right, 1875 / 1925; in lower center, Larkin Company logo.

The medal measures 38mm in diameter.

First North Pole Flight1926
JK-NP1
Gilded Bronze

The obverse bears a globe in center with north pole visible. Cyclone engine with emanating rays superimposed. Along top edge in two lines, COMMEMORATING THE FIRST NORTH POLE FLIGHT / BY LT. COMM. RICHARD E. BYRD MAY 9, 1926; along bottom edge, WRIGHT AERONAUTICAL CORPORATION

The reverse shows Byrd's airplane in flight over exaggerated north pole of globe, dog sled with two men laboring beneath, clouds swirling from bottom and left. Signed KILENYI at left bottom.

Rear Admiral Byrd (1888-1957) was an American naval officer who specialized in feats of exploration. He was a pioneering American aviator, polar explorer, and organizer of polar logistics. Aircraft flights, in which he served as a navigator and expedition leader, crossed the Atlantic Ocean, a segment of the Arctic Ocean, and a segment of the Antarctic Plateau. He might well have become the first human to cross the Atlantic by plane in a non-stop flight but a crash during a practice takeoff delayed his flight and Charles Lindbergh managed the feat before he could try again.

Byrd's attempt to reach the North Pole by plane was undertaken on May 9th, 1926. His plane, named "Josephine Ford" after the daughter of expedition sponsor and Ford Motor company president Edsel Ford, was a German Fokker F-VII Tri-motor monoplane. Byrd and pilot Floyd Bennett took off from and landed at Spitsbergen after covering 1,360 miles in 15 and a half hours. Byrd claimed to have reached the North Pole though this is very much doubted today. Regardless of the ultimate veracity of his claim, he and Bennett were celebrated as heros upon their return and awarded the Medal of Honor.

The medal measures 100mm (3 15/16in) in diameter and was struck by the Whitehead-Hoag Company.

Lindbergh Saint Louis Banquet Medal1927
JK-LB.2
Silver

The obverse bears standing female figure, arms raised, holding fleur-de-lis in her right and U.S. shield in her left, facing left; to her left, Statue of Liberty; to her right the Eiffel Tower; above, Linbergh's plane. Signed at lower right, KILENYI

The reverse bears Lindberghs Spirit of St. Louis over cloud=shrouded globe with his historic flight route marked as a dotted line. Below, COMMEMORATING / THE FIRST NEW YORK-PARIS FLIGHT / BY CAPT. CHARLES A. LINDBERGH / "SPIRIT OF ST. LOUIS / NEW YORK MAY 20TH PARIS MAY 21ST 1927

The edge is marked STERLING.

Lindbergh's historic flight captured the world's interest like few other events and he was celebrated as a hero wherever he went. His return to St. Louis, the city for which he had named his plane, was a triumph. A large celebratory banquet was organized and bronze versions of this medal were handed to every attendee.

While the bronze pieces are relatively common, the silver and gold variants are exceedingly rare. The one gold piece was presented to Captain Charles Lindbergh at the dinner in his honor and the silver pieces probably to people involved with the flight and maybe dinner organizers.

The medal measures 83.2mm in diameter and was struck in bronze, silver, and gold by Whitehead-Hoag of Newark. The reported mintages are 1 piece in 14k gold, 25 in silver, and 2000 in bronze.

Philadelphia Union League Club Medal1927
JK-APD
Bronze

The medal's obverse bears bust of Calvin Coolidge, right. Around, AMOR PATRIAE DUCIT

The reverse bears Presidential seal over wreath of oak leaves. Above, PRESIDENT / CALVIN COOLIDGE / HONORARY MEMBER / THE UNION LEAGUE / OF PHILADELPHIA; to left and right, 1862 - 1927

The Union Club of Philadelphia was founded in 1862 as a patriotic society to support the Union and the policies of President Abraham Lincoln. The Union League of Philadelphia laid the philosophical foundation of other Union Leagues across a nation torn by civil war. The League has hosted US presidents, heads of state, industrialists, entertainers and dignitaries from around the globe and has proudly supported the American military in each conflict since the Civil War. The Union League continues to be driven by its founding motto, "Amor Patriae Ducit" or "Love of Country Leads."

The bust on the obverse is from the 1925 Presidential inaugural medal.

The circular medal measures 63.7mm in diameter and was struck in bronze by the Medallic Art Company of New York.

All America Cables 50th Anniversary Medallion1928
JK-AAC
Bronze

The medal's obverse bears winged female over ocean, bundle of lightning bolts in one hand, thick cable in other. Around top, ALL AMERICA CABLES; signed over ocean surface at right, KILENYI

The reverse shows coastal scene with four natives on promontory signaling the arrival of a European sailing vessel across bay by way of smoke signals. Around top, FROM THE FIRST SIGNAL FIRES TO ALL AMERICA CABLES; at bottom, COMMEMORATING / FIFTY YEARS / OF SERVICE / TO THE AMERICAS / 1878 · MAY · 6 · 1928 ·

All America Cables was formed in February 1920 when it took over the assets of the Central and South American Telegraph Company. In 1938 All America Cables merged with the Commercial Cable Company and Mackay Radio & Telegraph to form the American Radio and Cable Corporation.

The circular medallion measures 82mm in diameter and was struck in bronze by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

Saturday Evening Post - 200th Anniversary1928
JK-SEP-200
Bronze

The obverse bears a mature bust of Franklin facing left. Signed at right, KILENYI.

The reverse bears image of corporate building. In exergue, COMMEMORATING THE / 200TH ANNIVERSARY / THE SATURDAY / EVENING POST / FOUNDED BY / BENJAMIN FRANKLIN; on left and right, 1728 - 1928.

The edge is marked WHITEHEAD-HOAG.

The medal measures 101mm in diameter and was struck by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

Richard E. Byrd Conquest of the Poles1929
JK-CP.1
Bronze

The obverse bears eagle perched on airborne Ford tri-motor; polar scene below, Signed at bottom right, KILENYI.

The reverse bears a bust (l.) of Richard Byrd wearing aviator's goggles emerging from a bank of clouds. Across, COMMEMORATING THE CONQUEST OF THE POLES / BY REAR ADMIRAL RICHARD E. BYRD / AND HIS ASSOCIATES / PRESENTED BY / THE AERONAUTICAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF AMERICA; along bottom edge, MAY 9 1926 - NOVEMBER 29 1929.

The medal measures 82.6mm (3.25") in diameter and was manufactured by Whitehead & Hoag. During the presentation banquet one gold medal was given to Admiral Byrd, his associates received silver medals, and all other guests received bronze medals. The exact mintage is not reported.

References: Marqusee 217

Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company 25th Anniversary1929
JK-DMD
Gold-plated bronze

The obverse bears bust of company founder Charles P. Dahlstrom. At top, TWENTY FIVE YEARS OF SERVICE / 1904 - IN FIRE CONTROL - 1929; at bottom, CHARLES P. DAHLSTROM / FOUNDER / DAHLSTROM METALLIC DOOR COMPANY / JAMESTOWN, N.Y.; signed on right, KILENYI

The reverse show classic industry commemorative motif with modern factory in center and small startup building in clouds above. Old building dated 1904, new factory dated 1929;

Charles Peter Dahlstrom was born September 4, 1872 on the Island of Gotland, Sweden. He was educated in Sweden and at the age of 12 attended a school of technology in Stockholm. He had an inventive mechanical mind and was a skillful mechanic. A natural inventor he was noted for his genius in devising improvements on machinery from a very young age. In 1891, after learning the trade of tool and die making, Dahlstrom came to the United States.

Dahlstrom found work at his trade in Buffalo where he worked for several years. He also spent time in Chicago and Milwaukee before eventually finding employment with the Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company. Here he formed a personal acquaintance with George Westinghouse and the two became friends.

Dahlstrom eventually made his way to Jamestown and entered the employ of the Art Metal Construction Company. It was during his time with Art metal that he invented a metallic door. After obtaining the patent to the door, Dahlstrom severed his connection with Art Metal and organized the Dahlstrom Metallic Door Company in 1904.

The door was immediately met with public favor, with its special adaptation to high buildings and hotels being quickly recognized. The door was adopted almost universally by all construction companies, and the company was soon compelled to erect a four-story brick plant on Buffalo street. From there the construction industry demanded other materials, and roll forming began for all types of construction material for high-rise buildings throughout the county.

During its heyday, the Dahlstrom plant was considered the largest and most important in Jamestown. By 1920, the company comprised ten buildings and employed 500 men. But Charles Dahlstrom did not live to see the full fruits of his labor. He died in Jamestown, April 10, 1909 at the age of 36.

The plaque measures 100mm by 76mm.

George Washington Bridge Dedication1931
JK-GWB.1
Bronze (76.3mm)
JK-GWB.2
Bronze (32.2mm)

The obverse bears perspective of Hudson River suspension bridge. Around left and top, GEORGE WASHINGTON BRIDGE; below, BUILT AND OWNED BY / THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY.

The reverse displays muses clasping hands over relief map of river and harbor. Around, A MEMORIAL TO FRIENDLY COOPERATION BETWEEN STATES; in exergue, NEW JERSEY - NEW YORK; signed at left top of exergue, KILENYI

In 1931, the Port Authority opened two major bridges, the George Washington Bridge on October 24th and the Bayonne Bridge on November 14th. The George Washington Bridge Dedication was a big affair commemorated with 2 gold medals, silver medals, bronze medals in 2 sizes, a hanging badge and a small round medal, represented here.

The dedication was a major political event. The Governor of New York, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a man with serious Presidential aspirations, was one of the major participants in the ceremonies.

All variants were produced by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

The small bronze variant measures 32.2mm in diameter, the large one 76.3mm and a fob with a diameter of 31.5mm. There are also silver and gold variants that are very rare.
Bayonne Bridge Dedication1931
JK-BB.1
Bronze (32.2mm)

The obverse bears standing figures of European settler, at left, and Native American, at right, against background of topographical map of New York and New Jersey. Above, DIVIDED BY NATURE UNITED FOR MUTUAL WELFARE; below: THE PORT OF / NEW YORK; signed at lower left, KILENYI.

The reverse shows Bayonne Bridge with seals of New York and New Jersey below with scrolls labelled: "NEW YORK" and "NEW JERSEY". Above, BUILT AND OWNED BY THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY; inscription BAYONNE / BRIDGE / DEDICATED 1931.

In 1931, the Port Authority opened two major bridges, the George Washington Bridge on October 24th and the Bayonne Bridge on November 14th. The George Washington Bridge Dedication was a big affair commemorated with 2 gold medals, silver medals, bronze medals in 2 sizes, a hanging badge and a small round medal.

The dedication was a major political event. The Governor of New York, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a man with serious Presidential aspirations, was one of the major participants in the ceremonies. Three weeks later, the major state election now past, the Port Authority ordered only enough medals to service the needs of the Bayonne Bridge Dedication on the day. Hence relatively few of the small round medals were probably produced.

Furthermore, there was the small issue of a short notice name change. On Oct. 31st, the Port Authority changed the name of the bridge from the Kill van Kull Bridge to the Bayonne Bridge. This added a time constraint that would also have mitigated against a larger number of medals than absolutely necessary being produced before the opening two weeks later.

All variants were produced by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

The small bronze variant measures 32.2mm in diameter, the large one 76.3mm and a fob with a diameter of 31.5mm. There are also silver variants that are very rare.
NBC's Tenth Anniversary1936
by Richard A. Loederer, E.P.H. James, Julio Kilényi
NBC-10.1
Bronze
NBC-10.2
Silver-plated Bronze

The obverse bears the old NBC logo crisscrossed in the center; double lightning bolts extending from all corners of the cross. On left and right of lightning bolts above, 19 / 26; on left and right of lighning bolts below, 19 / 36.

The reverse bears text only. Around, NATIONAL BROADCASTING COMPANY * A RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA SERVICE * ; in center field, TENTH ANNIVERSARY / TO THOSE WHO HAVE SHARED WITH US / IN THE ADVANCEMENT OF BROADCASTING.

The medal commemorates the tenth anniversary of the National Broadcasting Company which was founded in 1926. It was distributed to its employees in 1936. From Chris Bach, whom I owe big thanks for information about art medals, I learned the following:

This scarce Art Deco medal has long been "unsigned" in various auctions with no artist or sculptor identified or credited with the design. However, the Cleveland Museum of Art credits the medal as being a collaboration of three people: "modeled by Julio Kilenyi (American, b. 1885); obverse designed by Richard A Loederer (American, b. 1894) and the reverse designed by E.P.H. James (American)" - a gift to the museum's collection by the National Broadcasting Company in 1937 (No. 1937.9.A/B). A specimen at the New York Historical Society in NYC also credits Julio Kilenyi; and the Library of Congress collection identifies a similar item designed by Loederer in their NBC History Files: 1922-1986, Folder 173, Logos, "Photo of tenth anniversary (1936) plaque designed by Richard Loederer of Vienna."

This medal measures 76mm in diameter and was struck in bronze by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

John Hancock Diamond Jubilee1937
JK-JH
Bronze

The obverse bears bust of John Hancock facing right. Around, JOHN HANCOCK MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY; in exergue, famous "John Hancock" signature; artist's signature under truncation, KILENYI

The reverse bears to rectangular fields of leaves surrounding dedication field. Above, DIAMOND JUBILEE; (JOHN HANCOCK signature) / LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY / OF BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS / 1862 - 1937 / PRESENTED TO / IN TOKEN OF DISTINCTIVE SERVICE / RENDERED IN THE COMPANY'S / SEVENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY

The edge is marked ROBBINS CO / ATTLEBORO / BRONZE.

The medal measures 76.5mm and was struck by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

Lincoln Tunnel Dedication1937
JK-LT
Gilt Copper

The obverse bears high-relief clothed portrait bust of Abraham Lincoln facing right. Lincoln quote above around: FOR FURTHER UNIFICATION OF THE PEOPLE. Signed at bottom left of bust: KILENYI.

The reverse depicts a perspective view in low-relief of the western tunnel portal in Weehawken, New Jersey, looking east with Manhattan in the background. Inscription in exergue: LINCOLN TUNNEL/ DEDICATED 1937/ BUILT AND OWNED BY/ THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY.

Officially called the "Lincoln Tunnel Dedication Medal" on the ticket to the dedication, this 32mm gilt copper medal was originally distributed only to holders of tickets to the dedication ceremonies or luncheon on December 21, 1937. Ceremonies were held in both New York and in Weehawken, New Jersey. The two-part ticket, showing the obverse and reverse of the commemorative medal embossed in gold, had a perforated bottom that was removable and intended to be redeemed by the registered guest for their copy of the commemorative medal. A red printed serial number was printed on the back of both parts of the ticket.

The medal measures 32mm and was struck by the Whitehead & Hoag Company, New Jersey.

New Haven - 300th Anniversary1938
JK-NH-300.1
Bronze

The obverse bears scene with Reverend Davenport preaching the sermon Temptations of the Wilderness to the colonists under large oak tree. Below image in center field, THE DESERT SHALL REJOICE; Around top, QUINNIPIACK; at bottom, 1638.

The reverse bears image of modern New Haven with harbor. Below image in center field, AND BLOSSOM AS THE ROSE; Around, THREE HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY OF NEW HAVEN - 1938.

The edge bears the marks ROBBINS CO. / ATTLEBORO - BRONZE.

The medal measures 75mm in diameter and was struck by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

New York World's Fair Medal1939
JK-NYWF-1939
Bronze

The obverse bears view of iconic Trylon and Perisphere; at upper right, a full length figure of George Washington emerges from cloud banks. At bottom, NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR / 1939; at right, ©

The reverse bears three panels; top panel shows Trylon and Perisphere over radiant sun; above, THE WORLD OF TOMORROW; the middle panel shows view of Manhattan skyline as seen from the World's Fair grounds with legend TODAY; bottom panel shows view of New Amsterdam with legend YESTERDAY; signed at top right corner of bottom panel, KILENYI

The edge bears the marks ROBBINS CO. / ATTLEBORO - BRONZE.

This was the official medal of the New York World's Fair of 1939-40. The 190m-tall spire-shaped Trylon contained the (at the time) longest escalator and the 54m-diameter Perisphere housed a diorama called "Democracity" which depicted an topian city-of-the-future. A moving sidewalk transported spectators past the exhibits.

A much rarer version of the medal exists in which the year is 1940 rather than 1939.

The medal measures 63.5mm in diameter and was struck by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

New York World's Fair Medal1940
JK-NYWF-1940
Bronze

The obverse bears view of iconic Trylon and Perisphere; at upper right, a full length figure of George Washington emerges from cloud banks. At bottom, NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR / 1940; at right, ©

The reverse bears three panels; top panel shows Trylon and Perisphere over radiant sun; above, THE WORLD OF TOMORROW; the middle panel shows view of Manhattan skyline as seen from the World's Fair grounds with legend TODAY; bottom panel shows view of New Amsterdam with legend YESTERDAY; signed at top right corner of bottom panel, KILENYI

The edge bears the marks ROBBINS CO. / ATTLEBORO - BRONZE.

This was the official medal of the New York World's Fair of 1939-40. The 190m-tall spire-shaped Trylon contained the (at the time) longest escalator and the 54m-diameter Perisphere housed a diorama called "Democracity" which depicted an topian city-of-the-future. A moving sidewalk transported spectators past the exhibits.

This is the much rarer version of the medal that shows the year as 1940 rather than 1939.

The medal measures 63.5mm in diameter and was struck by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts.

New York Air Brake Company 50th Anniversary1940
JK-NYAB
Bronze

The obverse bears scene of steam train speeding around a bend in upper half. Two line inscription on a raised band across: THE NEW YORK AIR BRAKE COMPANY/ 1890 FIFTIETH ANNIVERSARY 1940. Underneath, a carriage drawn by 4 horses. Around top, NEW YORK AIR BREAKS OF THE PRESENT; below BRAKES OF THE PAST.

The reverse depicts an actual air brake. Above, under laurels, GOLDEN JUBILEE; below, AIR BRAKES BRING / SURETY AND SWIFTNESS

The medal is edge-marked ROBBINS CO / ATTLEBORO - GENUINE / BRONZE.

The New York Air Brake Company has a fascinating history including intrigue, corporate raiding, and even murder. In the late 19th century the booming railroad industry was in desperate need of a good braking system. As trains had gotten faster, slowing them down in a controlled fashion became an ever more pressing problem. By the 1860s, two systems were competing for dominance: a vacuum system and a pressurized air system.

Frederick Eames was an inventor who moved to Watertown, NY, in 1874 where he founded the Eames Vacuum Brake Company in 1876. After his top sales man had attempted to cheat him out of the company, he went to court and won back control in 1882. Unfortunately, he was fatally shot while retaking the factory in 1883.

The company was re-incorporated by John Thompson in 1890 as the New York Air Brake Company. Wall Street raiders used manufactured bad news to profiteer in the stock markets. Two investors stayed faithful and protected the young company. While Westinghouse had pioneered air brakes and consequently had a lead in the marketplace, the industry was reluctant to accept one monopoly supplier. Consequently, New York Air Brakes prospered with the growing railroad industry. Finally, in 1912, Westinghouse and New York Air Brakes agreed to share the market and started cooperating on research and development.

While the somewhat pedestrian motif of an air brake on the medal's reverse does not seem all too poetic, the fascinating story more than makes up for any perceived shortcomings. It is a beautiful example of an industrial medal of the 1940s.

The medal measures 76mm (3in) and was struck by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts in bronze.

Poland Exhibit at New York World's Fair1940
JK-PAD.1
Bronze

The obverse bears bust of Paderewski facing left. Above, PADEREWSKI; signed at bottom right, KILENYI.

The reverse depicts Poland Exhibit bilding at World's Fair surrounded by two trees. In exergue, REPUBLIC OF POLAND / EXHIBITION / NEW YORK WORLD'S FAIR / 1940

Ignace Jan Paderewski was one of the most famous pianists of his age and an inspiration to Polish nationals. In addition to being a world-renown pianist, he was also famous for his wit. One anecdote recounts how he was introduced to a polo player with the words:

"You are both leaders in your spheres though the spheres are very different."

He replied:

"Not so very different. You are a dear soul who plays polo, and I am a poor Pole who plays solo."

Kilenyi admired Paderewski and, when he was retained to design a medal symbolizing the friendship between the United States and Poland, he picked his likeness for the obverse. Because Paderewski was unable to sit for him and photos and drawings were not sufficient Kilenyi watched Moonlight Sonata, a movie featuring the famous pianist, to capture Paderewski's essence.

The medal comes in two variants that differ in diameter. The small variant measures 32mm in diameter, the large one 76mm.
U.S. Steel Corporation - 25 Years of Service1943
JK-USS-25
Sterling silver

The obverse bears bust of E. H. Gary, chairman of the United States Steel Corporation. Above, UNITED STATES STEEL CORPORATION; under truncation, signature of E. H. Gary / chairman; over shoulder at left, signed KILENYI.

The reverse bears image of four steelworkers in front of factory and locomotive. On left, 1943; above, 25 YEARS SERVICE; at right, E. J. & E. RY. Co.; in exergue, dedication to G.R. JACKSON; under workers' feet, STERLING - W.&H.CO;

The medal measures 44mm in diameter and was struck by the Whitehead & Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

Four Freedoms Victory Medal1945
JK-FF
Gilt Bronze

The obverse bears bust of Franklin Delano Roosevelt facing left. Around, FOUR FREEDOMS VICTORY MEDAL / FRANKLIN D / ROOSEVELT.

The reverse bears burning torch and laurel wreath. Above, VICTORY MEDAL; below, FOUR FREEDOMS / FREEDOM OF SPEECH / FREEDOM OF WORSHIP / FREEDOM FROM FEAR / FREEDOM FROM WANT.

The Four Freedoms were goals articulated by United States President Franklin D. Roosevelt on January 6, 1941. In an address known as the Four Freedoms speech (technically the 1941 State of the Union address), he proposed four fundamental freedoms that people "everywhere in the world" ought to enjoy:

  • Freedom of speech
  • Freedom of worship
  • Freedom from want
  • Freedom from fear

The medal measures 36mm in diameter.

References: HK913

New York International Airport Medal1948
JK-NYIA
Bronze

The medal's obverse bears a winged plaque and lots of lext. Around top, THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY; at top of center, NEW YORK / INTERNATIONAL / AIRPORT; on plaque, DEDICATION / JULY 31, 1948, followed by long list of names and titles; plaque surrounded by airport statistics.

The medal's reverse bears an aireal view of runway layout with clouds at top and sea at bottom. Around bottom edge, © NEW YORK INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT; signed over shoreline at left, KILENYI

The edge is marked ROBBINS - GENUINE / BRONZE

New York International Airport, now known as John F. Kennedy airport, was built to relieve LaGuardia Airport which was overcrowded soon after opening in 1939. Construction began in 1943, and about $60 million was initially spent of governmental funding, but only 1,000 acres (400 ha) of land on the site of the Idlewild Golf Course were earmarked for use.

The project was renamed Major General Alexander E. Anderson Airport in 1943, after a Queens resident who had commanded a Federalized National Guard unit in the southern United States and died in late 1942. In March 1948 the New York City Council changed the name to New York International Airport, Anderson Field, but the common name was "Idlewild" until 1963.

The Port Authority leased the JFK property from the City of New York in 1947 and maintains this lease today. The first airline flight from JFK was on July 1, 1948; the opening ceremony was attended by then U.S. President Harry S. Truman. The Port Authority cancelled foreign airlines' permits to use LaGuardia, forcing them to move to JFK during the next couple of years.

This medal measures 76mm (3in) in diameter and was struck in bronze and silver by the Robbins Company of Attleboro, Massachusetts. A silver variant was part of the Marqusee collection.

References: Marqusee 226

All that being said, I've only seen this medal come up once in two years, so it seems to be on the rarer side. In good shape, I would estimate it to be worth $100 to $130.

New York Port Authority Bus Terminal1950
JK-PA.1
Bronze

The obverse bears corner view of New York Port Authority Bus Terminal with billowing clouds above. Around, PORT AUTHORITY BUS TERMINAL; streets labeled, 41ST ST. and 8TH AVE.; below, TO SERVE THE PUBLIC; signed at bottom, KILENYI

The reverse bears garlanded tablet in center field. Around, THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY; above tablet, PORT AUTHORITY / BUS / TERMINAL; on tablet, DEDICATED / DECEMBER 14, 1950; list of officials' names follows.

By 1939, growing interstate bus traffic was causing chaos in New York City. Buses would drive to and from eight separate bus terminals scattered throughout Midtown. Congestion was a major problem, and the City needed a good answer.

Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia appointed a committee of City officials to resolve the issue. The committee arrived at several solutions, which were quickly shot down by the City's smaller bus terminals. That's when the Mayor asked the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, established in 1921, to promote and protect the commerce of the bistate region, to evaluate the concept of consolidating all smaller bus stations into one central terminal. Ground was broken on January 27, 1949, and on December 15, 1950, the new Bus Terminal was dedicated.

This medal measures 76mm in diameter and was struck in bronze by the Whitehead and Hoag Company of Newark, New Jersey.

New York Port Authority Bus Terminal1950
JK-PA
Sterling

The obverse bears corner view of New York Port Authority Bus Terminal with billowing clouds above. Around, PORT AUTHORITY BUS TERMINAL; streets labeled, 41ST ST. and 8TH AVE.; below, TO SERVE THE PUBLIC.

The reverse bears dedication in center field, TOM OGDEN / TARRYTOWN / N.Y.; around, THE PORT OF NEW YORK AUTHORITY / NEW JERSEY - NEW YORK; stamped, (mark) / STERLING.

By 1939, growing interstate bus traffic was causing chaos in New York City. Buses would drive to and from eight separate bus terminals scattered throughout Midtown. Congestion was a major problem, and the City needed a good answer.

Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia appointed a committee of City officials to resolve the issue. The committee arrived at several solutions, which were quickly shot down by the City's smaller bus terminals. That's when the Mayor asked the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, established in 1921, to promote and protect the commerce of the bistate region, to evaluate the concept of consolidating all smaller bus stations into one central terminal. Ground was broken on January 27, 1949, and on December 15, 1950, the new Bus Terminal was dedicated.

This token was probably awarded to workers who participated in construction but I am not certain. It could also be a Years of Service award for Port Authority employees, though such awards usually contain years of service language.

This token measures 34mm in diameter, the ring adds 6mm in height.

Fruit of the Loom Centennial1951
by Julio Kilényi
Bronze with brown patina

The obverse shows the distinctive Fruit of the Loom logo comprising an apple, leaves, grapes and currants with FRUIT OF THE LOOM in banner above.

The reverse depicts a tree-lined way with branches joining above. Inscription field in lower half, TO THOSE WHO HAVE SHARED / IN BUILDING OUR PRICELESS HERITAGE - / CONSUMER CONFIDENCE AND GOODWILL / 1851 - 1951; signed in lower left corner of field, KILENYI.

Fruit of the Loom is one of the oldest American brands still in existence. The brand dates back to 1851 when Robert Knight, a textile mill owner, visited his friend Rufus Skeel. Mr. Skeel owned a small shop in Providence, Rhode Island that sold cloth from Mr. Knight's mill. Mr. Skeel's daughter painted images of apples and applied them to the bolts of cloth. The ones with the apple emplems proved most popular. Mr. Knight thought the labels would be the perfect symbol for his trade name "Fruit of the Loom." When Congress passed the first trademark laws in 1870, Mr. Knight applied for protection and in 1871 received trademark #418 for the brand name "Fruit of the Loom.".

The medal celebrates the first one hundred years of the company's existence. Appropriately, the famous logo completely dominates the medal's obverse.

This medal is an irregular round measuring approximately 73mm in diameter.

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