American Numismatic Society (ANS)

ANS-1: Abraham Lincoln
by Emil Sigel

The American Numismatic Society (ANS) was founded in 1858 as the American Numismatic and Archaeological Society and was known under that name for roughly the next fifty years. In 1907 the Society officially adopted its current name.

Throughout its history the Society has supported collectors, scholars, and artists alike. It has commissioned medals to commemorate events or people and it has awarded prizes. From its inception in 1919 to this day, one of the most prestigious prizes which a medallic artist can win is the Society's J. Sanford Saltus Award for Excellence in Medallic Art.

The Society also always took full advantage of its willing benefactors. Generous members like J.P. Morgan, Archer Huntington, and J. Sanford Saltus always supported both the Society and the sculptors who designed rare and beautiful medals for the Society. Many of the Society's medallic issues were only (financially) successful because one of the great philanthropists underwrote the cost of manufacturing the dies or agreed to pay off debts that remained after sales of a particular issue had fallen short of expectations. Today, the ANS has a healthy endowment which will hopefully help it weather future storms.

ANS-6: George Washington Memorial
by Lea Ahlborn

There were often lengthy periods without medals being issued by the Society, interrupted by very active years in which three or even four different medals were offered to members. In the 150 years since the Society's first medallic issue in 1866, the Society has issued fewer than 70 different medals. Frequently, a medal was issued in two or three different metals and sometimes, for the most popular occasions, in different sizes as well. Commonly, the Society had one gold piece struck which was gifted to a benefactor or the person commemorated by the medal. The members were then able to purchase a bronze or silver variant.

ANS-25: New Theatre Medal
by Bela Lyon Pratt

Particularly in the early 20th century the Society often co-issued medals with other organizations that had an interest in the medal's subject matter. This helped the Society defray the cost of producing dies. Only the pieces issued to ANS members would be edge numbered which allows us to distinguish "ANS issued" pieces from "other" pieces. Mintage numbers reported on this site apply exclusively to the numbered ANS pieces. Even so, there are frequently some additional pieces that turn up on the market because the artist or the manufacturer created trial pieces that were not counted in the official ledger.

Except for the most popular issues like the Hudson-Fulton Celebration medal or the Bicentennial issues, mintages are usually in the tens or very low hundreds. This makes ANS medals quite rare and, when combined with the usually superb artistry, highly desirable for the serious American medal collector.

Collecting ANS Medals

For the collector, the ANS medals are both desirable and challenging:

  • The medals are mostly very rare and therefore expensive.
  • The medals typically trade upwards of $100 and can easily reach prices above $1,000 for one of the rarer issues, even in bronze.
  • The medals are not frequently traded. Availability tends to come in bursts when an existing collection is dissolved.

I have been a very active collector and have only managed to acquire maybe half of the ANS issues. I'll keep going because the ANS medals include some of the most stunning medallic art created by some of the biggest names in the field.

Next Steps

  1. Join the American Numismatic Society to support its work and gain access to future medallic issues straight from the source.
  2. Take a look at all the medals in the other tabs of this page. The Medals tab leads to a list of medal images and descriptions.
  3. Contact me if you are interested in buying or selling medals or want to help me improve the site. I am always interested in buying to complete or improve my own collection. Sometimes I have duplicates that I would be willing to sell. If you cannot or will not sell medals that I still need, at least share your high-quality pictures so I can complete the display section. If I don't have a picture for a medal, I don't have the medal in my collection and I would be interested in buying it.
  4. Check out the links in the Resources tab.
  5. Support this site with a small donation if you appreciate it as a resource and want to help me with hosting and bandwidth costs.

The list below contains the descriptions of all ANS medals and images of the issues that I have managed to collect so far or for which generous collectors have sent me images.

Click or tap medal images to show the other side. Slide image if images of more than one variant are available. Please offer me missing medals for sale or send me high resolution images for the ones that are currently showing as question marks.

Lincoln Memorial Medal1866
by Emil Sigel
ANS-1.1
Bronze

This is the first medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Lincoln, r. (no button holes on lapel). Around, SALVATOR / PATRIAE.; signed below truncation, EMIL SIGEL FECIT.

The reverse bears wreath around circumference; ribbon running through wreath with inscription PUB. BY THE / AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC / AND / ARCHAEOLOGICAL / SOCIETY / NEW YORK 1866. In center field, IN / MEMORY / OF THE / LIFE ACTS AND DEATH / OF / ABRAHAM LINCOLN / BORN FEBRUARY 12. 1809. / DIED APRIL 15. 1865.

This medal, the first one to be officially issued by the ANS, almost proved financially calamitous to the young organization. The dies gave out quickly and Sigel had to create a second set. The Society put a $720 lien on the set of dies until the additional costs were completely repaid.

The circular medal measures 83mm in diameter. Mintage numbers are uncertain but believed to be between 100 and 125 pieces in bronze and 30 in white metal (tin).

Lincoln Memorial Medal, Second Dies1867
by Emil Sigel
ANS-2.1
Lead

This is the second medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Lincoln, r. (two button holes on lapel). Around, SALVATOR / PATRIAE.; signed below truncation, EMIL SIGEL FECIT.

The reverse bears wreath around circumference; ribbon running through wreath with inscription PUB. BY THE / AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC / AND / ARCHAEOLOGICAL / SOCIETY / NEW YORK 1867. In center field, IN / MEMORY / OF THE / LIFE AND DEATH / OF / ABRAHAM LINCOLN / BORN FEBRUARY 12. 1809. / DIED APRIL 15. 1865.

This medal could also be regarded a variant of the first ANS medal. After the first set of dies broke this second set was created by Sigel. It turned out though that the first set was still usable. Consequently, all circulated pieces were struck using the first set of dies. The second set was only used once in 1915 for the Society's own archive.

The circular medal measures 83mm in diameter. Only one piece in lead is known to have been struck. Additionally, one set of uniface imprints is known.

First Membership Medal, Rejected Reverse Die1876
by George H. Lovett
ANS-3.1
White metal

This is the third medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears sprig of three oak leaves; above, ribbon bearing legend PARVA NE PEREANT; around AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY / (acorn) MEMBER'S MEDAL (acorn)

The reverse bears oak wreath around center field. Around, FOUNDED AT NEW YORK MDCCCLVIII / INCORPD MDCCCLXV; signed below wreath, G.H.L.

This medal was "the first draft" of the membership medal. The reverse die was rejected and a new version was created for the next official medal.

The circular medal measures 42mm in diameter. Only 12 pieces in white metal are known to have been struck.

First Membership Medal1876
by George H. Lovett
ANS-4.1
Bronze

This is the fourth medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears sprig of three oak leaves; above, ribbon bearing legend PARVA NE PEREANT; around AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY / (acorn) MEMBER'S MEDAL (acorn)

The reverse bears oak wreath around center field. Around, FOUNDED AT NEW YORK MDCCCLVIII / INCORPD MDCCCLXV; signed below wreath, G.H.L.

This medal was the membership medal that was handed out to most members.

The circular medal measures 42mm in diameter. It was struck in gold, silver and bronze in unknown mintages.

Cleopatra's Needle Medal1881
by Charles Osborne and Gaston Feuardent
ANS-5.1
Bronze

This is the fifth medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears an Egyption obelisk, sunburst behind; below, arms of the United States, surmounted by American Eagle; arms of New York City to right. Around, DISCIPULUS EST PRIORI POSTERIOR DIES; signed at bottom C.O. INC

The reverse bears inscription. Around, PRESENTED TO THE UNITED STATES BY ISMAIL KHEDIVE OF EGYPT / 1881; in center, QUARRIED AT SYENE / AND ERECTED AT HELIOPOLIS BY / THOTMES III / RE-ERECTED AT ALEXANDRIA / UNDER AUGUSTUS / REMOVED TO NEW YORK / THROUGH THE LIBERALITY OF / W.H. VANDERBILT / BY THE SKILL OF / LIEU. COM. H.H. GORRINGE U.S.N.

The circular medal measures 42mm in diameter. Its mintages are a bit unclear. There is one gold piece, at least 2 silver pieces and an unknown number pieces struck in bronze and white metal.

George Washington (Evacuation Day) Medal1883
by Charles Osborne & Lea Ahlborn
ANS-6.1
Bronze with hematite red patina

This is the 6th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears full length statue of Washington surrounded by rays of light and circle of thirteen stars. On left and right of statue, 1783 - 1883; signed below pedestal, C.OSBORNE INV. LEA AHLBORN FEC.

The reverse bears the seal of the New York Chamber of Commerce flanked on left and right by those of the City of New York and the American Numismatic Society. Twelve-line inscription reading TO COMMEMORATE / THE / CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY / OF THE EVACUATION OF NEW YORK / BY THE BRITISH, / AND THE ERECTION / BY THE / CHAMBER OF COMMERCE / OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK OF THE / WASHINGTON STATUE / IN / WALL STREET

Evacuation Day was a local holiday celebrated in New York to mark the departure of the last British troops from New York City on November 25, 1783.

The medal measures 57mm in diameter and was struck by the Royal Swedish Mint in bronze and silver. A total of 332 bronze pieces and only one silver were produced between 1883 and 1885.

Charles Edward Anthon Medal1884
ANS-7.1
Bronze
ANS-7.2
Silver

This is the 7th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust l. of Charles Edward Anthon. Around, CHARLES EDWARD ANTHON, LL.D.; signed below truncation, LEA AHLBORN.

The reverse bears five-line inscription within wreath of oak (left) and laurel (right); ANS seal at center bottom. Around, PRESIDENT AMERICAN NUMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY 1869 - 1883; in center, BORN IN / NEW YORK CITY / DEC. 6. 1822. / DIED AT BREMEN / JUNE 7. 1883.

Anthon served, with interruptions, as the ANS' President for many between 1867 and his death in 1883. The Society commemorated him with this medal in 1884. While the original subscription was soon filled, subsequent medal sales lingered for many years as both bronze and silver medals were still available for sale thirty in 1915. Members appreciated the medal's artistry and quality but they were not impressed by the likeness.

The medal measures 68mm in diameter and was struck by the Royal Swedish Mint in bronze and silver. A total of 15 silver and 85 bronze pieces were produced in 1884.

Daniel Parish Medal1890
ANS-8.1
Bronze

This is the eighth medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Daniel Parish, l. Around, DANIEL PARISH, JR.; signed to left of bust, LEA AHLBORN FEC.

The reverse bears inscription within oak and laurel wreath. FROM HIS / FELLOW NUMISMATISTS / IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION / OF HIS ZEAL FOR AND / DEVOTION TO THE / SCIENCE; around wreath, ANNO SEXTO PRAESIDENTAE SOCI. AMERI. NUMIS. ET ARCHAEOL. / * MDCCCLXXXX *

The circular medal measures 46mm in diameter. Its mintage is 1 piece in gold, 1 in silver and an unknown number in bronze.

Columbus Quatercentenary Medal1893
by James H. Whitehouse & William Walker
ANS-9.1
Bronze
ANS-9.2
Silver

This is the 9th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Columbus l. wearing cap. Around, CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS GAVE A NEW WORLD TO HUMANITY / + ; signed below truncation, TIFFANY & CO. N.Y.

The reverse bears wreath around circumference with ANS seal at 4:30. In center field, AFTER / FOUR HUNDRED / YEARS OF PROGRESS / FREE AMERICA / HONORS ITS / DISCOVERER

The circular medal measures 77mm in diameter and was produced by Tiffany and Company of New York City. The mintage for this medal is unknown.

William Augustus Muhlenberg Medal1896
by Victor D. Brenner
ANS-10.1
Bronze with saddle-brown patina

This is the 10th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Dr. Muhlenberg, right. To left, reading upwards, WILLIAM AVGVSTVS / MVHLENBERG D.D.; to right, reading upwards, FOVNDER OF ST. LVKE'S / HOSPITAL; signed along rim at lower right, V.D.BRENNER N.Y.

The reverse bears seal of hospital over branches of palm and oak to right. Seven-line inscription across center left, THE AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL / SOCIETY / COMMEMORATES BY THIS MEDAL / THE OPENING OF THE NEW / ST. LVKE'S HOSPITAL / MDCCCXCVI

The medal commemorates the opening of the new St. Luke's Hospital building in New York City. St. Luke's Hospital was founded in 1858 by Dr. William Muhlenberg, an Episcopalian clergyman, as a private hospital. In 1896 it relocated from its original site at 5th Avenue and 54th Street to Amsterdam Avenue and 113th Street. In 1979 St. Luke's merged with Roosevelt Hospital.

Victor David Brenner cut the dies for this medal (his first for the ANS) by hand. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 10 in silver, and 89 in bronze.

Grant Monument Medal1897
by Tiffany & Co.
ANS-11.2
Silver

This is the 11th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Ulysses Grant r.; below, seal of the Society; to left of truncation, four stars denoting his rank. Around, GENERAL ULYSSES S. GRANT; signed on trunctation, TIFFANY

The reverse shows a view of Grant's tomb. Around, DEDICATED NEW YORK APRIL 27 1897; in exergue, ISSUED BY THE THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC / AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY; signed at bottom, TIFFANY & CO.

The medal measures 64mm in diameter and was designed and struck by Tiffany & Company. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 81 in silver, and 500 in bronze.

References: Marqusee 376

National Conference of Charities and Corrections Medal1898
by Victor D. Brenner
ANS-12.1
Bronze

This is the 12th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears winged angel of Mercy descending with arms extended over two seated figures in despair, female to the left representing poverty, male to the right representing crime. In exergue, ISSUED BY THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC / AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY / NEW YORK; signed at lower right, V D BRENNER 98

The medal measures 77mm in diameter. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 30 in silver, and 253 in bronze.

Greater New York (Charter Day) Medal1898
by Edward Hagaman Hall and Tiffany & Co.
ANS-13.4
Copper

This is the 13th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears five seated female figures representing the five burroughs, the names of each burrough beneath them. Behind figures, within ornamented pediment supported by two columns, inscription, NEW YORK / JANUARY 1 / MDCCCXCVIII; view of New York harbor in background; seal of Society at bottom. Around, COMMEMORATING THE CONSOLIDATION OF THE MUNICIPALITIES ABOUT THE PORT OF NEW YORK

The reverse bears four vignettes divided by the four arms of a Dutch windmill. Starting on left, in counter-clockwise direction, the vignettes depict Peter Minuit purchasing Manhattan Island from the Indians, Henry Hudson's Halve Maene, the Dutch evacuating Fort Amsterdam, a Contiental Army officer reading the Declaration of Independence. Around, (tulip) MAY 4 1626 (scallop shell) SEPT. 2 1609 (crown) SEPT. 8 1664 / JULY 9 1776 (eagle)

The medal measures 64mm in diameter. Designed by Edward Hall and modeled and struck by Tiffany & Company, the reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, and unknown numbers in silver and bronze. I own a piece that—at least according to PCGS—seems to be struck in copper and is not documented in the great Miller book on the ANS medal series.

References: Marqusee 197

Prince Henry of Prussia Medal1902
by Victor David Brenner
ANS-14.2
Silver

This medal is the 14th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Prince Henry of Prussia, l. Around, ISSVED BY THE AMERICAN NVMISMATIC AND ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY / NEW YORK FEBRVARY 1902 ; signed over shoulder to right of bust, V.D.BRENNER

The reverse bears god Mercury riding on a cloud, bearing fruits, flowers and a caduceus; German and American flags to the right. Around, TO COMMEMORATE THE VISIT OF HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS PRINCE HENRY OF PRVSSIA; signed at 5:00, V.D.BRENNER

In 1902 Prince Henry of Prussia visited the United States to take delivery of a schooner yacht for his brother, Emperor Wilhelm II of Germany. The yacht was christened Meteor III by Alice Roosevelt on February 25, 1902.

While the idea for the medal came from the ANS' Edward Dean Adams, Victor David Brenner himself underwrote the issue, accepting all the risk with the exception of the material cost of the four pieces struck in gold. He graciously allowed the ANS to sell as many silver pieces as it could and retain all the profit thereof.

The circular medal measures 69mm in diameter. The mintage is reported as 4 pieces in gold, 301 in silver, 2 in copper and 1 in aluminum.

Amerigo Vespucci Medal1903
by Victor D. Brenner
ANS-15.1
Bronze

This is the 15th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears half figure of Vespucci, half right, head right, holding a partially unrolled map ; to the right is a map of the New World, taken from the then recently discovered map of Martin Waldseemüller. Between bust and map at lower right, 19 (ANS seal) 03 / AMERIGO VESPVCCI; signed along lower right, V.D.Brenner

The reverse bears a small hemispherical map inserted in the Waldseemüller wall map of 1507 on the left side; on the right Vespucci is holding dividers above facsimile signature of Waldseemüller. Signed in lower left of field, V.D.Brenner

The rectangular plaque measures 76mm x 58mm. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 101 in silver, 59 in bronze and 1 in copper.

John Paul Jones Medal1906
by Victor D. Brenner
ANS-16.2
Silver

This is the 16th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Jones, three quarters left in front of laurel branch; to left, shield with anchor. In panel at bottom, JOHN · PAVL · JONES / · 1747 · 1792 · ; signed along left edge, V. D. Brenner

The reverse depicts winged Fame blowing a trumpet at right; in upper background, a funeral procession proceeds from left to right. Above, AMERICA · CLAIMS · HER · ILLVSTRIOVS · DEAD; below, · PARIS · ANNAPOLIS · 1905 · ; (ANS seal) at bottom left.

The rectangular plaque measures 80mm x 60mm and was struck by the Paris Mint. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, and 100 each in silver and bronze.

Sir Francis Drake Medal1907
by Rudolf Marschall
ANS-17.2
Silver

This medal is the 17th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Drake, slightly left, in period dress with ruff collar. Above, SIR FRANCIS DRAKE 1540 - 1596; at lower right, signed Marschall; below, in lower left corner, 19 (ANS oak leaves) 07

The reverse bears a portion of the "Silver Map" medal showing the Americas. At lower left, IN COMMEMORATION OF THE / DISCOVERY AND LANDING / VPON THE / NORTH-WESTERN COAST OF AMERICA / BY THE / FIRST ENGLISH CIRCVMNAVIGATOR / A D 1579

The medal measures 56mm x 65mm and was struck by the Imperial-Royal Mint of Vienna, Austria. The mintage is reported as 1 piece in gold, 102 in silver and 102 in bronze.

Archer Milton Huntington Medal1908
by Emil Fuchs
ANS-18.1
Bronze

This is the 18th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears two stading male figures leaning on the sides of a coin press with a third seated male figure in front, inspecting a coin through a magnifying glass. Around top, ARCHER MILTON HUNTINGTON MEDAL

The reverse bears a standing female figure facing left, holding open scroll depicting the Society's building and inscription: IN / COMMEMORATION / OF THE / FIFTIETH / ANNIVERSARY / OF THE / AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC SOCIETY; on left and right, 1858 - 1908; below, (ANS seal) THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY

The circular medal measures 68mm in diameter and was struck by Whitehead and Hoag and the Medallic Art Company. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 11 in silver, and 25 in bronze.

Fiftieth Anniversary Medal1908
by Tiffany & Co.
ANS-19.1
Bronze

This is the 19th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears the seal of the American Numismatic Society.

The reverse bears an inscription: MDCCCLVIII / · APRIL · VI · / MCMVIII

The circular medal measures 25mm in diameter and was struck by Tiffany & Company. The reported mintage for this medal is 1 piece in gold, 25 in silver, and 100 in bronze. The silver pieces were suspended from a clasp whereas the bronze pieces were just the mdeal.

Algernon Sullivan Medal1908
ANS-20.1
Bronze

This uniface medal was the 20th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Algernon Sydney Sullivan, l. Above, * IN * HONOR * OF * / ALGERNON SYDNEY SULLIVAN / 1826 1887; below, (flower) (flower) (flower) / HE REACHED OUT BOTH HANDS IN CONSTANT / * HELPFULNESS TO HIS FELLOW MEN *; signed in lower right corner, J.E. ROINÉ

The reverse bears an older man reaching out to aid a youth, his flaming torch lighting the younger's. Below is a quote from James Russell Lowell: AS ONE LAMP LIGHTS ANOTHER NOR GROWS LESS / SO NOBLENESS ENKINDLETH NOBLENESS; signed at lower right, J.E. ROINÉ

Originally struck by Whitehead-Hoag, the Medallic Art Company of New York issued a restrike in 1959.

The rectangular medal measures 60mm x 88mm and was struck by the Arthus Bertrand and J.K.Davison's Sons. The mintage is unknown for both bronze and silver editions.

Centennial of the Catholic Diocese of New York Medal1908
ANS-21.1
Bronze

This medal was the 21st official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears portraits of the seven archbishops who presided over the Diocese of New York during its first century. Archbishop Farley in the center.

The reverse displays a view of St. Patrick's Cathedral in he center; at sides, partial representations if St. Peter's Church of 1808 on Barclay Street and St. Patrick's Church on Mott Street. consecrated in 1815. Four coats of arms entwined in a wreat at the sides.

Edge contains maker's mark, MED. ART CO & (D within diamond);

This medal was issued by both the American Numismatic Society (ANS) and the Catholic Diocese of New York. Only medals which bear edge numbers were issued by the ANS. One medal in gold was presented to Pope Pius X. Silver and bronze medals with the edge number 1 were presented to Archbishop Farley and 100 medals each in silver and bronze (numbered 2-101) were for ANS members. There is an unknown number of silver and bronze medals struck without numbers for the Diocese.

The medal measures 76mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 1 piece in gold, and 101 each in bronze and silver.

References: Baxter 299

Grover Cleveland Memorial Medal1908
ANS-22.2
Silver

This medal was the 22nd official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears half-length seated portrait of Grover Cleveland, r.; above at right, within wreath of ivy, VOX POPULI; above left, GROVER CLEVELAND; below, (ANS seal) MDCCCXXXVII * MDCCCCVIII.

The reverse bears seated allegorical figure representing Democracy, holding starred sphere in her raised left hand, right hand supporting table of law, face upturned at the words PVBLIC OFFICE / A PVBLIC TRVST. Background depicts public building with pillars, monumental column with eagle perching on top, and oak trees. Below, * PRESIDENT * / MDCCCLXXXV * MDCCCLXXXXIII; at left bottom, signed J E ROINÉ

This medal was issued to commemorate the life and works of Grover Cleveland (1837-1908), the 22nd President of the United States. He was an immensely popular President who won the popular vote three times though that was only sufficient to elect him President twice. This achievement was all the more remarkable because he was running as a Democrat in a time of Republican dominance.

The rectangular medal measures 78mm x 89mm and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 2 pieces in gold, 50 in silver and 100 in bronze.

Hudson-Fulton Medal1909
ANS-23.3
Bronze
ANS-23.4
Silver

This medal was the 23rd official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears Henry Hudson and sailors on the Halve Maen during the hoisting of some freight onto the ship. Around top, DISCOVERY OF HUDSON RIVER BY HENRY HUDSON A D MDCIX; at lower left, THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY; at lower right, HUDSON-FULTON CELEBRATION COMM.; in exergue, HALVE MAEN; signed in lower right corner, E FUCHS

The reverse bears three seated female figures representing Steam Navigation, History, and Commerce; above, portrait of Robert Fulton. In background, views of New York in 1807 and 1909. Below portrait, ROBERT FULTON / 1765 1815; in exergue, FIRST USE OF STEAM NAVIGATION / ON THE HUDSON RIVER / 1807; signed in lower right corner, E FUCHS

This medal, in one of its many variants, is probably one of the most common ANS medals being traded. There are 15 known variants ranging from 1¼in silver-plated to 3in gold and 4in silver. Even the large gold variant had 11 pieces produced! This is probably the most successful ANS medal ever.

The offical medal measures 76mm in diameter and was struck by Tiffany & Company of New York as well as Whitehead and Hoag of Newark. The reported mintage for the official ANS issue is 100 pieces in silver but there is a wide range of variants that are listed separately.

References: Baxter 99, Marqusee 186, 187

Abraham Lincoln Centennial Medal1909
ANS-24.1
Bronze

This uniface medal was the 24th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears full-length seated portrait of Abraham Lincoln at a table, signing the Emancipation Proclamation while winged Fame is crowning him. (ANS seal) in upper left corner. Below, 1809 ABRAHAM * LINCOLN 1909; signed in upper right corner, J.E. ROINÉ SCP

The edge is marked WHITEHEAD-HOAG 50

Originally struck by Whitehead-Hoag, the Medallic Art Company of New York issued a restrike in 1959.

The rectangular medal measures 73mm x 101mm and was struck by the Whitehead-Hoag of Newark, New Jersey. The reported mintage is 2 pieces in gold, 75 in silver and 100 in bronze.

New Theatre Medal1916
ANS-25.2
Bronze

This was the 25th official medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears nude female seated, holding a mirror but turning face away from it. To left, in four lines, 1909; to right, THE / NEW / THEATRE / OF / NEW / YORK / (ANS logo)

The reverse bears a full length female figure standing, holding a tablet from which is suspended a garland. A crtain at each side is drawn back by a nude child; two Roman lamps below. Incuse at bottom, 1909.

Edge is numbered.

This medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society (ANS) to commemorate the opening of the New Theatre in New York. The New Theatre, located at 62nd Street and Central Park West opened on November 6, 1909. It was noted for its fine architecture but due to poor acoustics and an inconvenient location it was financially unsuccessful. The theater was ultimately demolished in 1931.

Although the medal is dated 1909, it was not actually made available to members until 1916. Barbara Baxter comments that

"... the medal commemorating the opening of the New Theatre in York, with its highly decorative figural compositions and sinuous lines, perfectly captures the spirit of the Gilded Age."

The medal comes in two sizes, one measuring 77mm in diameter, the other 106mm. It was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 50 pieces in bronze for the larger size, at least 1 in gold, 50 in silver and 50 in bronze for the smaller size.

References: Baxter 220, Marqusee 323

ANS-25.1
Bronze
106mm
50
ANS-25.2
Bronze
77mm
50
ANS-25.3
Silver
77mm
50
ANS-25.4
Gold
77mm
1+
Second Membership Medal, Error Reverse1910
ANS-26.1
Bronze

This medal was the 26th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears nude male from behind, studying a portrait held in outstretched arm. In right field, FOVNDED / IN / NEW YORK / MDCCCLVIII; in left field, signed G.B.

The reverse bears two wreaths, one of oak branches above and one of laurel below. In center, THE / AMERICAN / NVMISMATIC / SOCIETY / PARVA-NE-PERANT / MEMBERS MEDAL / 1910; signed G.B.

This version had a spelling error on the reverse die ("perant" instead of "pereant") but it seems that the mistake was caught before the pieces were engraved with members' names because the only observed examples have been unawarded.

The circular medal measures 77mm in diameter and was struck by Tiffany & Company. The mintage is unknown for both bronze and silver editions.

Second Membership Medal1910
ANS-27.1
Bronze
ANS-27.3
Silver

This medal was the 27th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears nude male from behind, studying a portrait held in outstretched arm. In right field, FOVNDED / IN / NEW YORK / MDCCCLVIII; in left field, signed G.B.

The reverse bears two wreaths, one of oak branches above and one of laurel below. In center, THE / AMERICAN / NVMISMATIC / SOCIETY / PARVA-NE-PERANT / MEMBER'S MEDAL / 1910; signed G.B.

This version corrected the spelling error on the reverse die ("perant" instead of "pereant") and added an apostrophe to "members" but is otherwise identical to the previous version.

The circular medal measures 77mm in diameter and was struck by Tiffany & Company and the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage is unknown for gold, silver, and bronze editions.

International Medallic Exhibition Medal1910
by Godefroid Devreese
ANS-28.2
Bronze uniface

This medal was the 28th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears Columbia, standing on globe, holding a laurel branch in one hand and a flag in the other; she faces a nude male holding a lyre, rising upward from cloud. At lower left, · THE · / · AMERICAN · / · NUMISMATIC · / · SOCIETY · ; signed, G. DEVREESE

The reverse bears a draped female holding a torch, born by an eagle in flight; clouds in background. Below, · INTERNATIONAL · / · MEDALLIC · EXHIBITION · / · NEW · YORK · ; at lower right, · 1910 · ; signed G. DEVREESE

This is a very rare medal and it is not quite clear why it was never offered for sale. The gold pieces were used as award medals and given to the Society's treasurer Charles Pryer and its benefactor J. Sanford Saltus.

The rectangular medal measures 50mm x 89mm and was struck by Alphonse Michaux. The mintage is 2 uniface medals in gold, 2 medals in bronze, and an unknown number of uniface medals in bronze.

Ernest Babelon Medal1910
by Godefroid Devreese and Rudolf Bosselt
ANS-29.1
Bronze

This medal was the 29th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Babelon, left. Around, ERNEST · BABELON · DE · L'INSTITUT · ; signed to the right of bust, G. DEVREESE. / 1910

The reverse bears helmeted bust of Athena, left, holding spear and shield. Around, CONGRES INTERN · DE NUM · ET D'ART DE LA MED · BRUXELLES 1910 · ; signed in right field, R. BOSSELT

Ernest Babelon (1854-1924) was a French numismatist and classical archaeologist. In 1899 he was recognised with the Medal of the Royal Numismatic Society and in 1922 with the Archer M. Huntington Medal.

Issued jointly by the ANS and the Société Hollandaise-Belge des Amis de la Médaille d'Art, the reported mintage only applies to those pieces that were produced for the ANS.

This medal measures 65mm in diameter and was struck by Alphonse Michaux. The mintage is 156 pieces in silver and 505 in bronze.

References: Baxter 259, Marqusee 120

J. Pierpont Morgan Memorial Medal1913
ANS-30.1
Bronze

This is the 30th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears facade of building with four columns; in center, female figure representing Art descending steps, holding statuette in right and laurel wreath in left hand. On sides, representations of Painting and Sculpture. Above, CHARACTER RELIGION FRIENDSHIP; immediately below, MDC / CCXXX / VII and MCM / XIII; at lower left, (ANS seal); signed at lower right, E. FUCHS

The reverse bears tablet inscribed JOHN / PIERPONT / MORGAN flanked by two draped figures, female holding palm branch representing Fame at left, male with sledge hammer and anvil representing Industry at right.

The rectangular medal measures 90mm x 74mm and was struck by Whitehead and Hoag of Newark, New Jersey. The mintage is 1 piece in gold, 100 pieces in silver and an 200 pieces in bronze.

References: Baxter 292, Marqusee 188

ANS-30.1
Bronze
90mm x 74mm
200
ANS-30.2
Silver
90mm x 74mm
100
ANS-30.3
Gold
90mm x 74mm
1
American Declaration of War Medal (Uniface)1917
by Eli Harvey
ANS-31.1
Reddish bronze with brown patina

This is the 31st official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears martial American Eagle, perched on crag, wings spread threateningly. Below, APRIL - 6 - 1917; signed in lower right, ELI HARVEY / FECIT. ©; American Numismatic Society oak leaves in circle beneath signature.

The edge is marked MEDALLIC ART CO. N.Y. and stamped with the number 42.

This medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society to commemorate the United States' entrance into World War I. After publicly striving to keep the United States neutral, President Woodrow Wilson finally asked Congress for a "war to end all wars" that would "make the world safe for democracy". Congress formally declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917.

A bronze medallion of the eagle was sent to Pershing's field headquarters in France by the medal commissioners. Mr. Harvey didn't know it. In a note under the photograph of the medal found in Harvey's personal collection, he wrote:

"One day I found a letter in the vestibule mailbox addressed to Mrs. Harvey (my first wife Mary) from the general. I asked if she had written to General Pershing and she said yes. 'Why didn't you tell me?' I asked. 'Because I knew thee would say, don't bother the general now, he has charge of two million American boys.' I agreed."

General Pershing, who had made a specialty of studying these birds, liked it very much.

The medal measures 88.9mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 1 piece in gold, 50 in silver and 113 pieces in bronze.

ANS-31.1
Bronze
90mm
113
ANS-31.2
Silver
90mm
50
ANS-31.3
Gold
90mm
1
American Declaration of War Medal (Two-Sided)1917
by Eli Harvey
ANS-32
Bronze

This is the 32nd official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears martial American Eagle, perched on crag, wings spread threateningly. Below, APRIL - 6 - 1917; signed in lower right, ELI HARVEY / FECIT. ©; American Numismatic Society oak leaves in circle beneath signature.

The reverse bears two oak branches and inscription THE / AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC / SOCIETY / ISSUED / IN COMMEMORATION / OF THE / DECLARATION OF WAR / BY THE / UNITED STATES / OF / AMERICA.

This medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society to commemorate the United States' entrance into World War I. After publicly striving to keep the United States neutral, President Woodrow Wilson finally asked Congress for a "war to end all wars" that would "make the world safe for democracy". Congress formally declared war on Germany on April 6, 1917.

This two-sided version of ANS-31 is much rarer because the Society's Medal Committee decided that the reverse side was redundant and detracted from the whole medal. The trial strike with the reverse was mixed into the entire order but the remaining medals were struck as uniface medals.

The medal measures 90mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is at least 2 pieces in bronze.

ANS-32.1
Bronze
90mm
2
St. Bartholomew's Church Medal1917
by Bertram Goodhue & Attillio Piccirilli
ANS-33.1
Bronze

This is the 33rd official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears St. Bartholomew standing in front of cityscape, a model of the church in his left hand; to his right is a shield bearing a flaying knife. At his feet, MAY 1ST AD / MDCC CCXVII (ANS seal); Around, ✝ IN COMMEMORATION OF THE LAYING OF THE CORNERSTONE OF S BARTHOLOMEWS CHURCH

The reverse bears cruciform composed of the shields of the Episcopal Diocese of New York, St. Bartholomew's Church, New York City, and the United States; in center round, a sailing ship. Around, BEHOLD THE TABERNACLE OF GOD WITH MEN & HE WILL DWELL WITH THEM

The circular medal comes in two sizes, 51mm and 38mm in diameter, and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage is 3 pieces in gold (51mm), at least 11 pieces in silver (51mm) and an unknown number of large and small pieces in bronze.

ANS-33.1
Bronze
51mm
unknown
ANS-33.2
Silver
51mm
11+
ANS-33.3
Gold
51mm
3
ANS-33.4
Bronze
38mm
unknown
Visit of the French and British War Commission1917
by Daniel Chester French & Evelyn B. Longman
ANS-34.2
Silver

This is the 34th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears softly modeled and beautiful head of Victory (r.), wearing helmet decorated with the lilies of France, the oak leaves of Britain and the pine of the United States. Around, TO COMMEMORATE THE VISIT TO NEW YORK - OF THE FRENCH AND BRITISH WAR COMMISSIONS 1917; signed on collar, D C FRENCH.

The reverse bears allegorical group of three figures. On the right, standing figure of female Liberty holding sword, greeting figures of Joan of Arc and medieval knight representing France and England. Signed at lower right, E.B.LONGMAN / SC. 1917.

The medal is numbered and edge-marked MEDALLIC ART CO. N Y.

The United States officially entered World War I in 1917 and quickly tried to coordinate the war effort with the the European allies. The French and British delegations were first to arrive and were given a spectacular reception. New York mayor John Purroy Mitchel had put together a Committee of Reception that was in charge of organizing the event. As part of the activities, the committee and the American Numismatic Association (ANS) teamed up to issue this commemorative medal. They engaged Daniel Chester French and Evelyn Longman to design the two sides of the medal. Evelyn Longman was one of French's students and the first woman sculptor to be elected a full member of the National Academy of Design in 1919.

Barbara Baxter considers this medal one of French's "most outstanding pieces," the other one being his American Red Cross medal.

The medal measures 63.4mm (2.5in) and was struck in bronze, silver and gold by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage is 5 in gold, 109 in silver and 171 in bronze.

References: Baxter 317, Marqusee 180

Catskill Aqueduct Completion1917
by Daniel Chester French, Augustus Lukeman
ANS-35.1
Bronze
ANS-35.2
Silver
ANS-35.3
Bronze (struck 38mm)
ANS-35.4
Gold-plated bronze (struck 38mm)

This is the 35th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears a female head (alternatively representing Greater New York or Columbia) crowned with laurel in high relief, facing right.

The reverse depicts a full figure of nude male facing left, standing erect, pouring water from classic vase resting on his shoulder. On Left and right, TO COMMEMORATE - THE COMPLETION / OF THE CATSKILL - AQUEDUCT / AN ACHIEVEMENT - OF CIVIC SPIRIT / SCIENTIFIC GENIUS - AND FAITHFUL LABOR / 1905 NEW - YORK 1917

This medal was authorized by the Medal subcommittee of the Mayor's Catskill Aqueduct Celebration Committee and issued by the American Numismatic Society (ANS).

Daniel Chester French won this commission through his acquaintance with Robert de Forest, with whom he served on the board of trustees of the Metropolitan Museum of Art and who also was the president of the Mayor's Catskill Aqueduct Celebration Committee. The committee was convened to organize the celebrations in honor of the completion of the massive Catskill Aqueduct project. Construction had started twelve years earlier in 1905. By 1917 a 163-mile long system of tunnels and pipes had been completed to transport water from the Catskill Mountains to New York City.

Although the medal is commonly credited to Daniel Chester French, the obverse was actually designed by both French and Augustus Lukeman.

In 1933, Clyde Curlee Trees, the President of Medallic Art Company chose French's beautiful female head as the symbol of his company and obviously gained permission to use the design in many different ways. The head became not only the company logo but also appeared on bronze replica medals that were struck in an unknown quantity. As late as 1979 the Medallic Art Company issued gold-plated struck bronzes in the small diameter.

The original medals measured 76mm in diameter and were cast by the Medallic Art Company in a quantity of 57 bronze and 12 silver pieces. Later, an unknown number of the smaller 38mm diameter brones were struck by the Medallic Art Company.

References: Baxter 245, Marqusee 177

ANS-35.1
Bronze
76mm
MEDALLIC ART CO. N.Y.
76
ANS-35.2
Silver
76mm
15-23
ANS-35.3
Bronze
38mm
unknown
ANS-35.4
Bronze
38mm
© 1979 MACO BRONZE - GOLD PLATED
unknown
Independence Day Medal1918
ANS-36.1
Bronze
ANS-36.2
Silver

The obverse bears allegorical female lightly touching the Liberty Bell. Around, JULY 4 1776; at right, signed (AGN monogram).

The reverse depicts a circle of shields bearing the arms of the sixteen countries participating in the celebration. In center, TO COMMEMORATE / THE INTERNATIONAL / CELEBRATION OF / INDEPENDENCE DAY / JULY 4 (ANS oak leaves) 1918.

This is the 36th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society. Though dated 1918, the medal was actually issued in 1919 to commemorate the international celebration of the American Independence Day in the previous year. The sixteen nations that had participated in the festivities (other than the United States) were: the United Kingdom, Belgium, Greece, Brazil, Chile, Uruguay, Argentina, Nicaragua, Guatemala, Peru, Cuba, Portugal, Serbia, Italy, and France.

The medal measures 63mm (2.5in) in diameter and was struck in bronze and silver. Only 39 silver and 63 bronze pieces were struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York and made available to ANS members and members of the Mayor's Committee on National Defense.

King Albert and Queen Elisabeth Aerial Crossing of the English Channel1918
ANS-37.1
Bronze
ANS-37.2
Silver

This medal was the 37th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears conjoined busts of Belgium's King and Queen facing left. Below, streamer with legend FORTISSIMI - SUNT - BELGAE; at bottom, ANS sigil. Around, KING * ALBERT * AND * QUEEN * ELISABETH * OF * THE * BELGIANS; signed (TSS monogram) in lower left field.

The reverse bears channel seascape with low-flying bi-plane, clouds, and flying bird. Around, COMMEMORATING - THEIR - AERIAL - CROSSING - OF - THE - ENGLISH - CHANNEL - JULY - MDCCCCXVIII; signed below waves, T. SPICER-SIMSON

The medals are edge-stamped MEDALLIC ART CO. N.Y. and inscribed with a number.

This medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society to commemorate the flight of the king and queen of Belgium to England on the occasion of King George and Queen Mary's silver anniversary. The celebrations took place in London on July 6th, 1918.

The latin quote on the obverse is an abbreviation from the opening paragraph of Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War—"(Horum eorum) fortissimi sunt Belgae", meaning "The bravest of these are the Belgians." It is easy to forget that the year was 1918 and World War I was still being fought in Europe. Flying across the Channel by itself was not yet a common endeavor, but doing it during an active war was certainly a display of courage that cold not help but boost morale.

The medal measures 63.8mm (2.5in) and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York in bronze and silver. As with all early ANS medals, the mintage is very low; only 97 medals were struck in silver and 136 in bronze. Originally, the silver medals were sold for $10 and the bronze medals for $5.

References: Baxter 160, Eimer 1961, Johnson 32, MACo 1918-009, Marqusee 365, Storer 960

ANS-37.1
Bronze
63.8mm
136
ANS-37.2
Silver
63.8mm
97
ANS-37.3
Gold
63.8mm
1
ANS-37.4
Brass
63.8mm
1
ANS-37.5
Tinted metal
63.8mm
1
J. Sanford Saltus Medal1919
ANS-38.1
Bronze

This medal was the 38th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears kneeling nude woman, left, holding a medal in her left hand and a sculptor's tool in her right; tree to her right with branch extending over her. Around, PARVA · NE · PEREANT; in exergue, AN (oak leaves) S; signed at lower right, FE (AAW monogram) CIT

The reverse bears Pegasus in central medallion, sun and clouds in background; Above, · THE · J · SANFORD · SALTUS · / AWARD MEDAL; below, · OF · THE · AMERICAN · / · NUMISMATIC · SOCIETY · ; around central field, FOR · SIGNAL · ACHIEVEMENT / IN · THE · ART · OF · THE · MEDAL

This medal measures 78mm in diameter and was cast by Tiffany & Company and struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage in silver and bronze is not known.

Joan of Arc Medal1919
ANS-39.1
Bronze

This medal was the 39th issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears portrait of Joan of Arc in armor facing left, holding sword hilt up like a cross, face raised in prayer or contemplation. Around, :: HOMAGE ::+:: TO :+: THE :+: MAID :+: OF :+: FRANCE ::; signed at bottom, A - H

The reverse displays gothic banner of Joan of Arc with other pennants fluttering behind. Around, JOAN OF ARC PARK DEDICATED JANUARY 6, 1919.

Miss Hyatt was chosen by the ANS to execte this beautiful and sensitive medal because she had created the distinctive statue of Joan of Arc on Riverside Drive, overlooking the Hudson River. The Vatican canonized Joan of Arc in the same year, therefore the medal was doubly appropriate and not just representative of the park dedication ceremony.

The medal measures 65mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 1 piece in gold, 74 pieces in silver, 119 pieces in bronze and 1 piece in lead.

References: Marqusee 206

ANS-39.1
Bronze
65mm (2.5in)
119
ANS-39.2
Silver
65mm (2.5in)
74
ANS-39.3
Gold
65mm (2.5in)
1
ANS-39.4
Lead
65mm (2.5in)
1
Treaty of Versailles Medal1919
ANS-40.1
Bronze

This medal was the 40th medal officially issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears a male astride winged horse, accompanied on sides by personifications of Justice and Peace. To left, JUSTICE with scales and wreath; to right, PEACE with (ANS seal); signed at lower right, (C B monogram)

The reverse shows a view of the Palace of Versailles where the World War I peace treaty was signed. Wreath around circumference. Above, PEACE OF VERSAILLES; on ribbon, 1919; below, THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY

The medal measures 63mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 113 in silver and 318 in bronze.

Many thanks to Brian Holt for the images of the bronze medal.

ANS-40.1
Bronze
63mm (2.5in)
318
ANS-40.2
Silver
63mm (2.5in)
113
Visit of the Prince of Wales1919
ANS-41.1
Bronze
ANS-41.2
Silver

This medal was the 41st medal officially issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears portrait of Edward, Prince of Wales, in uniform, facing right. Around, EDWARD PRINCE OF WALES; at bottom right, heraldic badge over circled (JF monogram).

The reverse displays allegorical female figure flanked by two vertical oak branches. To left of figure, COMMEMORATING / THE VISIT OF / HRH THE PRINCE / OF WALES / TO THE / UNITED STATES / NOVEMBER / MCMXIX / A N S (with oak leaves).

This was the fourth medal issued by the American Numismatic Society (ANS) in 1919, a very productive year for the Society as far as medals were concerned. J. Sanford Saltus, the great benefactor of American Medallic Art, provided not only funds covering the costs of design and die creation, but also enough money to strike one copy in gold. That copy was presented to the Prince of Wales during a ceremony on board the battleship Renown. In addition to ANS members, the privilege of subscribing to the medal was extended to the Pilgrims of the United States.

The medal measures 63.3mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 1 piece in gold, 145 in silver, 227 in bronze, and 1 in brass (made for the British Museum).

References: Baxter 160, Johnson 35, MACo 1919-009, Marqusee 156

ANS-41.1
Bronze
63.3mm (2.5in)
227
ANS-41.2
Silver
63.3mm (2.5in)
145
ANS-41.3
Gold
63.3mm (2.5in)
1
ANS-41.4
Brass
63.3mm (2.5in)
1
American Red Cross War Council Medal1921
by Daniel Chester French
Bronze

This medal was the 42nd issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust-length profile image of soldier wearing helmet. Signed below bust, DCF.

The reverse bears image of nurse attending injured soldier depicted within cross. Above, THE AMERICAN RED CROSS; to left and right of vertical bar of cross, TO COMMEMORATE - THE VISION AND / ACHIEVEMENT OF - THE WAR COUNCIL / 1917 - 1919; signed below cross, WHL / DCF.

The medal is numbered and contains the maker's mark MEDALLIC ART CO. NY.

This medal was co-issued by the American Red Cross and the American Numismatic Society in 1920. Daniel Chester French designed it and the Medallic Art Company executed it. The initials of Reverend William H. Low in the medal's reverse were included due to his suggestion that the the nurse stand in front of the bed.

The medal was awarded to twelve New York businessmen who volunteered for the War Council of the American Red Cross. As the Red Cross Bulletin Vol. IV No. 51 (December 13, 1920) states:

"The General Board also presented to the four members of the Wat Council who were present the special Daniel Chester French medal, authorized at its last meeting in recognition of their war service. These were Eli Wadsworth, Cornelius N. Bliss Jr., George E. Scott and Charles D. Norton. The eight other members of the War Council who will receive their medal are Henry P. Davison, chairman; William Howard Taft, George B. Case, Jesse H. Jones, Edward N. Hurley, John D. Ryan, Grayson M., P. Murphy, and Harvey D. Gibson."

The medal measures 70mm (2.75in) and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 12 pieces in gold, 4 in silver and 205 in bronze.

References: Baxter 237, Marqusee 176

Marshal Foch Medal1921
ANS-43.1
Bronze

This medal was the 43rd issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears facing bust of Marshal Foch. Around, COMMEMORATING THE VISIT OF MARSHALL FOCH TO THE VNITED STATES; to left, MCMXXI; to right, A N S with oak leafs.

The reverse presents winged female figure holding shield, between the shields of France to the left and the United States to the right. Signed at lower left, (RA monogram ) / FECIT

Marshal Ferdinand Foch (1851-1929) was a French soldier, military theorist, and the Commander-in-Chief of the Allied forces in World War I.

The medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society (ANS) in 1921 to commemorate Foch's visit to the United States. Generals Foch and Pershing had coordinated their trips so that they would arrive more or less simultaneously, even though they were sailing on two different ships. Pershing arrived on Friday, October 28, 1921, two hours before Foch arrived on the Paris. He was given a hero's welcome by the entire city.

The medal measures 64mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 1 piece in gold, 94 in silver, 205 in bronze and 1 piece in copper.

References: Marqusee 5

Joseph Hodges Choate Medal1922
ANS-44.1
Bronze
ANS-44.2
Silver

This medal was co-issued by the Century Association and the American Numismatic Society (ANS) in 1922. It was the 44th medal issued by the ANS. It was also the first in a series of ANS medals commemorating men who distinguished themselves in public service.

The obverse bears bust of Choate left. Around left edge, CHOATE; at lower right, signed H. A.

The reverse bears oil lamp of Century Association above, surrounded by C - A; circled ANS oak leaves below; laurels around. In center field, JOSEPH HODGES CHOATE / 1832 - 1917 / PATRIOT / AMBASSADOR / JURIST / ORATOR

Joseph Hodges Choate, born in Salem, Massachusetts, was a famous lawyer who litigated many of the most prominent cases in the late 19th century. He allied himself with the Republican Party and was a frequent campaign orator. In 1894 he was president of the New York State constitutional convention. In 1899 he was appointed ambassador to England by President McKinley and held that position until 1905. When World War I broke out he became a fervent supporter of the Allied cause. His death in 1917 was hastened by the physical strain of supporting the British and French commissions in New York.

Herbert Adams was a personal friend of Joseph Choate.

The medal measures 64mm (2.5in) in diameter. The Medallic Art Company of New York struck 238 pieces in bronze and 98 in silver. Originally the bronze pieces were available for $5 and the silver pieces for $10.

References: Baxter 224, Marqusee 2

Paul Revere Medal1925
ANS-45.1
Bronze

This medal was the 45th issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bst of Paul Revere, l. above sword entwined with fillet and a silver urn; cable border around circumference. Above, --- PAUL REVERE ---; to right, -1753 / 1818-; to left and right, PATRIOT SOLDIER / SILVERSMITH ENGRAVER

The reverse shows Revere standing beside horse, awaiting the lantern signal from the church steeple. Around, PAUL REVERE SESQUI-CENTENNIAL 1925; in exergue, A N (ANS seal) S; to left and right of exergue, signed A F

The medal measures 63mm (2.5in) in diameter. The Medallic Art Company of New York struck 173 pieces in bronze and at least 65 in silver.

Manhattan Tercentenary Medal1926
ANS-46.1
Bronze

This medal was the 46th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears group of Native Americans bartering with Peter Minuit with Dutch sailing ship in background, surrounded by border consisting of strings of wampum. Above, 1926; in exergue, MANHATTAN

The reverse bears conjoined walking nude male and female winged figures representing Commerce and Intellectal Life of New York City; in background, skyline of New York. Above, NEW YORK CITY / 1926; at lower left, A · N · S / NYHS; signed at right of exergue, HM

This medal measures 64mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage was 50 pieces in silver and 100 in bronze.

Many thanks to Brian Holt for the images of the bronze medal.

Washington Sesquicentennial Medal1939
ANS-47.2
Silver

This medal was the 47th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Washington in uniform, left. Around, ONE · HUNDRED · AND · FIFTETH · ANNIVERSARY / 1789 · ANS (oak leaves) · 1939 ·

The reverse bears inscription within circle of thirteen stars: · TO · / · COMMEMORATE · / · THE · INAUGURATION · / · OF GEORGE · / · WASHINGTON / · FIRST · PRESIDENT · / · OF · THE · UNITED · STATES · / · APRIL · 30TH · / · 1789 ·

This medal measures 63mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage was 38 pieces in silver and 95 in bronze. The mintage of silvered bronze pieces is not known.

Centennial Medal of the American Numismatic Society 1958
ANS-48
Bronze

This is the 48th issue by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears a kneeling nude inspecting two pieces of a fossil, hammer on the ground. Legend reads THE / AMERICAN NUMIS - MATIC / SO - CIETY / 1858 / 1958. There reverse bears two artisans at anvil, one holding die with tongs, other holding hammer, winged Pegasus above.

Laura Gradin Fraser wrote in the pamphlet that accompanied the medal:

"When nature petrified the first forms of animal and plant life, Nature made the first dies. The obverse of the American Numismatics Society Centennial Medal shows the potential archeologist, who, having broken a stone asunder, discovers a petrified animal form in one half and in the other a perfect impression of it, or the die."

The Pegasus represents the Arts and it lends inspiration to the artisans who are forging a medal using the simplest of tools.

This medal measures 89mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The reported mintage is 620 pieces in bronze.

Louis C. West Medal1960
by Gilroy Roberts
ANS-49.1
Bronze

This medal was the 49th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears bust of Louis C. West, three-quarters left. Around, LOUIS C. WEST; signed on truncation, GILROY ROBERTS 1960

The reverse bears the ANS seal in center field. Around, PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY / 1949-1959

This medal measures 69mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage was 1 piece in gold and 175 in bronze.

Sydney P. Noe Medal1965
by the Medallic Art Company
ANS-50.1
Bronze

This medal was the 50th official issue of the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears the ANS seal. In upper left, PARVA / NE / PEREANT; in lower left, THE / AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC / SOCIETY

The reverse bears eight-line inscription: TO / SYDNEY P. NOE / FIFTY YEARS OF / DEVOTED SERVICE / THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC / SOCIETY / NOV. 1, 1915 / NOV. 1, 1965

This medal measures 70mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. The mintage was 1 piece in gold and an unknown number in bronze.

New York State Bicentennial1976
by Amerigo Giannicchi
ANS-51.1
Bronze
ANS-51.2
Silver
ANS-51.3
Gold

This medal is the 51st issue of the American Numismatic Society (ANS).

The obverse bears portrait of Revolutionary War soldier with his hand clasped on the barrel of a rifle. On left and right, 1776 - 1976; at left over shoulder, ANS oak leaves in circle; signed at bottom.

The reverse displays ribbon flying from pole. In ribbon, LIBERTY / NEW YORK STATE AMERICAN / BICENTENNIAL / 1776 - 1976; New York State seal at bottom right.

The edge contains maker's mark (see Variants).

This medal was also issued as part of a set called the "Official Thirteen States Medal Collection." Each of the thirteen original states of the Union had its own Bicentennial Committee which selected an artist to design the state's medal.

The bronze and silver medals measure 63.5mm in diameter and were struck by the Medallic Art Company of Danbury, Connecticut. The gold medal measures 25.4mm in diameter. The 38mm proof medals were struck by the Franklin mint. No mintages are reported.

ANS-51.1
63.5mm
Bronze
MEDALLIC ART CO.NY BRONZE
ANS-51.2
63.5mm
Silver
MEDALLIC ART CO.N.Y. .999+ PURE SILVER
ANS-51.3
25.4mm
18K Gold
MEDALLIC ART CO. DANBURY, CT. 18KT. GOLD
ANS-51.4
38mm
Bronze
ANS-51.5
38mm
.999 Silver
ANS-51.6
38mm
.925 Silver

The bronze medal commonly trades on eBay in the $15 to $35 range. The silver medal does not come up quite as often and usually trades over $100.

New York City Bicentennial1976
by John Russell Ridge
ANS-52.1
Bronze

This medal is the 52nd issue of the American Numismatic Society (ANS).

The obverse bears the original Federal Hall with original seal of New York City below. Around, NEW YORK CITY / FIRST CAPITAL OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; under Federal Hall, WASHINGTON'S INAUGURATION / FEDERAL HALL - 1789

The reverse bears five Revolutionary War soldiers with cannon and flag. Around, BICENTENNIAL / 1776 / 1976 / AMERICAN REVOLUTION; signed below cannon, JOHN RUSSELL / RIDGE

The edge contains maker's mark (see Variants).

This medal was also issued as part of a set called the "Official Thirteen States Medal Collection." Each of the thirteen original states of the Union had its own Bicentennial Committee which selected an artist to design the state's medal.

The bronze and silver medals measure 63.5mm in diameter and were struck by the Medallic Art Company of Danbury, Connecticut. The gold medal measures 25.4mm in diameter. The 38mm proof medals were struck by the Franklin mint. No mintages are reported.

ANS-52.1
63.5mm
Bronze
MEDALLIC ART CO.NY BRONZE
ANS-52.2
63.5mm
Silver
MEDALLIC ART CO.N.Y. .999+ PURE SILVER
ANS-52.3
25.4mm
18K Gold
MEDALLIC ART CO. DANBURY, CT. 18KT. GOLD
ANS-52.4
38mm
Bronze
ANS-52.5
38mm
.999 Silver
ANS-52.6
38mm
.925 Silver

The bronze medal commonly trades on eBay in the $15 to $35 range. The silver medal does not come up quite as often and usually trades over $100.

ANS Member's Medal1977
by Frank Eliscu
ANS-53.1
Bronze

This is the 53rd official medal issued by the the American Numismatic Society (ANS) and its fourth membership medal. Earlier membership medals were designed by George H. Lovett, Victor David Brenner, and Gutzon Borglum.

The obverse depicts a high relief owl on branch with oak leaves and acorns. Above, MEMBER'S MEDAL; to left, PARVA NE PEREANT; at right, under leaves, signed ELISCU.

The reverse bears image of oak sapling bursting through solid rock. Around, THE AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY.

While the oak leaf cluster has long been the logo of the ANS and has always been present on the medals it has issued, Frank Eliscu integrated the motif in a new way. In his design for the membership medal, the oak leaves are part of a sapling that fights its way from the nurturing ground to light and air. Life requires growth, not just in nature but also in numismatic organizations.

The medal measures 64mm in diameter and was struck by the Medallic Art Company of New York. Mintages for gold, silver, and bronze editions are not reported.

125th Anniversary Medal1983
by Marcel Jovine & Stefano Johnson
ANS-54.1
Reddish bronze
ANS-54.2
Silver

This design was chosen as the 54th medal released by the American Numismatic Society to celebrate its 125th anniversary in 1983.

The medal's obverse bears a moneyer using the ancient technique of hammer striking to produce a coin. Behind him, pieces from the ANS collection. At lower right, signed with stylized Jov / 83

The reverse is divided into three panels vertically. Upper panel shows screw press; lower panel shows Janvier panthographic lathe making a reduction of Brenner's Lincoln cent; middle holds legend in three fields, 1858 / THE AMERICAN / NUMISMATIC / SOCIETY / 1983 / (ANS oak leaf) / "parva ne pereant"; signed at lower right, MARCEL JOVINE and S.JOHNSON

The medal measures 90mm x 110mm and was struck in bronze, silver, and gold by the Medallic Art Company. The mintage was 500 pieces in bronze, 100 in silver, and 3 in gold.

125th Anniversary Medal (Rejected Design)1983
ANS-54-REJ
Cast bronze with saddle-brown patina

A selection committee initially chose this design for the American Numismatic Society's 125th anniversary but the full Council then rejected it in favor of an alternate design by Marcel Jovine.

The medal's obverse bears a nude medalist working a coining press. Signed with stylized Jov / 83 at lower right.

The reverse bears engraver's hand working on ANS oak leaves. Signed with stylized Jov / 83 at lower right.

This design was initially chosen by a selection committee which recommended it to the ANS Council. The Council apparently had issues with the nudity of the medalist on the design's obverse. Some members of the Anniversary Medal Committee were so pleased with the original design that they commissioned twelve sets of uniface bronze casts from Jovine. The original clay models remain at the Society.

The uniface medals measures 71mm in diameter. The artist produced 12 sets in total.

Statue of Liberty Centennial1985
ANS-55.1
Bronze with sea-green patina
ANS-55.2
Silver

This is the 55th official medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse depicts Lady Liberty's serious face, radiant crown dominating upper half of medal. On lower right, 1886 / 1986.

The reverse bears torch with swirling flames. To right, in cursive, Liberty; around lower left, AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY; signed at lower right, E. DAUB

The edge is marked at 6:00 with issuer's mark, © ANS 1985; numbered at 12:00, 423/500.

This heavy and striking medal was issued by the American Numismatic Society (ANS) in 1985 to commemorate the upcoming centennial of the Statue of Liberty. Eugene Daub created a beautiful ovoid medal that surprises in its design. While the Statue of Liberty is very much a vertical object, the oval medal is in landscape orientation. Daub then picks two of the statue's defining features, the head and the torch, to represent it on the two sides. On the obverse, the face looks sternly at the beholder, as if to remind him of his obligations. On the reverse, the flame of Liberty burns brightly, its promise spelled out on the side.

The silver medals are numbered in two styles. Originally, only 100 silver medals had been ordered and they were numbered XXX/100, for example 001/100. When demand for the silver medal proved strong an additional 50 pieces were ordered and they are numbered just with their three digit number.

This medal is an ovoid measuring 100mm x 76mm and was struck by the Medallic Art Company. The mintage was 2 pieces in gold, 150 in silver and 500 in bronze.

ANS Endowment Medal1988
by Janos Kalmar
ANS-56.2 (Top)
Silver
ANS-56.2 (Bottom)
Silver

This medal is the 56th issue of the American Numismatic Society (ANS).

This two part medal has an upper and a lower half that fit together. The upper half is composed of two stylized fingers holding a coin. The upper half's outside has artist's (JK monogram) on the coin; the inside bears ANS seal on coin; on fingers, THE / AMERICAN NUMISMATIC SOCIETY

The lower half bears negative image of fingers and coin on inside and smooth bottom with ANS inscribed at lower right.

The medal was issued as part of the Society's endowment drive between 1986 and 1989. While the silver pieces were awarded to donors of $5,000 or more, the bronze pieces were for available for sale at $100.

The medal was cast by the C.A. Brown Foundry and measures approximately 83mm x 82mm. The mintage is reported as 70 pieces in silver and 48 pieces in bronze.

Columbus Quincentenary Medal1992
by Magdalena Dobrucka
ANS-57.1
Bronze with brown patina
ANS-57.2
Antiqued silver

This is the 57th medal issued by the American Numismatic Society.

The obverse bears one of Columbus' ships breaking the surface of stylize, raised globe. At left, 1492; below, in script, Voyage of Columbus; signed at right, M D

The reverse bears an American Eagle hovering over incuse stylized globe. At right, 1992; below, in script, The American Numismatic Society

Despite this medal's strong visual appeal sales were disappointing. By 1992, Columbus' transformation from an admired explorer to a symbol of European imperialism was well under way. Public interest in the 500th anniversary of his voyage proved to be fickle.

The irregular squarish medal measures 68mm x 68mm and was struck by J. Jenkins Sons, Baltimore. A total of 2 gold, 100 silver and 500 bronze pieces were produced.

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